Bargain Jungle: David Holmes – Gone (PFM Remix)

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Gome-PFM-RemixAnother edition to our bargin jungle feature, and this one really is a bargain.

In the 90′s when dance music exploded onto the commercial scene across Europe, countless major labels, desperate to cash in and gain some credibility, either created their own sublabels or bought out smaller indie labels to distribute the booming talent.

As jungle continued to storm the charts in around 1994/96 and gain precious Radio One airplay it seemed like the majors were falling over themselves to commission jungle producers to create remixes for their new artists.
Photek and Source Direct signed multi-album deals with Virgin subsidiary Science, Goldie, LTJ Bukem etc were all regulars on the remix scene.

Major labels pressed up vinyl, with the remixes often on side B, in huge units.
Now, often overlooked, these pieces of plastic can be barely given away but they often contain great jungle / drum and bass remixes.

David Holmes was signed to Go! Discs, despite initially being an indie label boasting acts like Paul Weller and Portishead they were eventually bought out by Universal in 1996. Holmes specialised in often deep and moody electronica or trip hop (depending which side of the Atlantic you are from).

Enter PFM.

Speed Club FlyerPFM aka Progressive Future Music were already masters in their art of deep, atmospheric and other worldly drum and bass, becoming one of the most celebrated acts of the Good Looking Organisation.

For David Holmes ‘Gone’ they did what they did best. Swirly synths, vocals, rolling breaks sampled from Bobby Byrds ‘Hot Pants’.
It captures the Speed sound brilliantly and is a fine snapshot of the so called ‘intelligent’ drum and bass movement that Good Looking pioneered and delivered so well.

There are currently 22 vinyl copies for sale on discogs, starting from a bargainous £0.50p!

About Law

Main author and creator of Drumtrip. I have been listening to and mixing drum and bass in its various forms since 1998. Drumtrip was designed to celebrate what I consider the genre's peak years of 1992 to 1996.

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